Stamford, Connecticut – A Bibliography – J

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Index: 0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | HI | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | XYZ
Refers to the index of names and subjects covered by individual bibliography items.

Abbreviations
Locations

  1. Jackson, Kenneth T. Crabgrass frontier : the suburbanization of the United States. New York, New York: Oxford University Press; 1985; x, 396 pp., illus., notes, index, d.w., 24 cm. ISBN: 0195036107.
Notes: Title page reads: “[line of cuts illustrating grass] / CRABGRASS / FRONTIER / The Suburbanization / of the United States /       / Kenneth T. Jackson /       / New York       Oxford / OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS / 1985″
Location: Ct, CtBSH, CtDabN, CtEhar, CtFa, CtFaHi, CtFaU, CtGre, CtGu, CtH, CtHT, CtMil, CtMW, CtNbC, CtNhH, CtNlC, CtNowa, CtShel, CtSHi, CtSU, CtU, CtWal, CtWhar, CtWillE, CtWilt, CtY, DLC, MB, MH, NN.       For references to Stamford, Connecticut, see: pp. 176, 268.
According to the author, Stamford’s initial urban renewal program was delayed for several reasons, during which time the plans were redrawn as corporate headquarters in Manhattan began contemplating moving elsewhere. At the point they began embarking on their exodus, there was commercial office space available in Stamford.
  2. Jacobs, Harry Allan. “Stamford Children’s Home.” Architecture. 1919 Feb; Vol. 39 (No. 2) pp. 46-49.
Notes: Published by Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, New York.     “Merged with American Architect, to form American Architect and Architecture.” (Library of Congress). Includes plan of the first and second floors. This structure was located at 126 Hamilton Avenue, Stamford, Connecticut.     
Location: CtY, DLC, MB.
Abstract: “The artist, whether he be architect, sculptor, painter, or musician, generally gets his inspiration from some idea which forms the nucleus for his completed picture. When asked to design the new Stamford Children’s Home, there happened an extremely pleasant episode in my life which helped me to create the new building. 
Everyone has read Jean Webster’s charming little book “Daddy Long Legs,” and nearly everyone has seen the play. One can never forget the squalid orphan asylum, little children dressed alike in gingham, with the unhappy look, living in surroundings without love, and scolded from morning until night by a soulless matron. 
It was just about this time that I completed an orphan asylum at Pleasantville on the cottage plan, which we hoped had done away with the abuses and shortcomings of the orphan asylum as shown in the play.       …….     I hope I have been able to put the ideas of Miss Webster, which no doubt she would have built had she lived, into this new building (in Stamford).
There were to be no large dormitories with fifteen and twenty children in each dormitory. No, she would have had none of that; no more than four or five children in each room. Then there would be fine open sleeping-porches for the poor children who were anemic and needed plenty of fresh air. In the dining-room there were not to be long tables with oil-cloth and all the children at one table; there again her idea was to have little tables of four or five to a table, making cozy little groups, and the rooms would not be plastered with chromos and ugly pictures. Her idea was to have little net curtains and in the living-room book-shelves with cheery books. The walls were to be rough sand-finish plaster of a nice bright cream tone. ………….   There is no style of architecture which lends itself so admirably to the picturesque, domestic qualities as the domestic English Gothic, so we have made a low, rambling building of two stories instead of the high, boxy building.   ………….
I hope that I have not omitted anything to make the children comfortable and happy. I have endeavored, in every way, to keep the spirit of the real home, and trust that this feeling will permeate the soul of the little children and make them happy and contented, and fit them morally, physically, and mentally to battle with what is to come.”     Harry Allan Jacobs, pp. 46, 48.
  3. Jacobus, Donald Lines. List of officials – civil, military, and ecclesiastical of Connecticut Colony from March 1636 through 11 October 1677 and of New Haven Colony throughout its separate existence – also soldiers in the Pequot War who then or subsequently resided within the present bounds of Connecticut. New Haven, (Connecticut): Connecticut Society of the Order of the Founders and Patriots of America; 1935; v, 65 pp., 24 cm. 
Notes: For references to residents of Stamford, Connecticut, see: pp. 2-5, 7, 13-15, 18, 21-22, 26, 29-30, 32, 37, 48, 54, 56-59, 62.       Imprint on reverse of p. 65 reads: The Printing-Office of the Yale University Press. Connecticut Tercentenary Publication, Roland Mather Hooker, For The Publication Committee.                                   Location: Ct, CtAns, CtBran, CtDabN, CtDer, CtEhar, CtGre, CtH, CtHi, CtMer, CtMil, CtNb, CtNh, CtNhH, CtNowi, CtS, CtSHi, CtSoP, CtU, CtWal, CtWhar, CtWilt, CtY, DLC, MH, MoU, NN, OCl, PHi, PPAmSwM, WaS, WaSp.       Collier (pp. 21, 289).
  4. James R. Osgood & Co. “Alterations & additions in house for Sands Seely, Esq.: Stamford, Conn. – W. Richard Briggs, Arch’t., Bridgeport, Conn.” American Architect and Building News. 1878 Sep 21; Vol. 4, Plate No. 143.
Notes: Published by James R. Osgood & Co., Boston, Massachusetts, 1878-1908. Continued by American Architect, New York, New York, 1909. Imprint on Plate No. 143 reads: The Heliotype Printing Co., 230 Devonshire St., Boston.
Location: CtY, DLC, MB, MWA.   
Abstract: “Alterations in house for Sands Seely, Esq., Stamford, Conn., Mr. W. Richard Briggs, Architect. – This alteration was completed a year ago, at a cost of about $3,000. The old roof was not altered, nor were the windows or doors moved, the additions being put on with as little change as possible.” American Architect and Building News, p. 101.
  5. — “Building for C. O. Miller, Esq., Stamford, Conn. – Warren R. Briggs, Architect, Bridgeport, Conn.” American Architect and Building News. 1883 Dec 8; Vol. 14, Plate No. 415.
Notes: Published by James R. Osgood & Co., Boston, Massachusetts, 1876-1908. Continued by American Architect, New York, New York, 1909. Imprint on Plate No. 415 reads: The Heliotype Printing Co. 211 Tremont St. Boston. 
 Location: CtY, DLC, MB, MWA. 
Abstract: “Building For C. O. Miller, Esq., Stamford, Conn. Mr. Warren R. Briggs, Architect, Bridgeport, Conn.
The building is constructed with pressed-brick front and terracotta finish; inside finish of ash. It has a frontage of thirty-seven feet and a depth of one hundred and twenty-two feet. Offices on second story, and large hall on third. It is heated throughout by steam. Cost of building complete, $25,000.” American Architect and Building News, p. 270.
  6. — “Exhibition of the T Square Club and Philadelphia Chapter A. I. A.: House at Stamford, Conn. – Newman & Harris, Architects.” American Architect and Building News. 1908 Apr 22; Vol. 93, (No. 1687).
Notes: Published by James R. Osgood & Co., Boston, Massachusetts, 1876-1908. Continued by American Architect, New York, New York., 1909.
Location: CtY, DLC, MB, MWA.
For additional references to this house, see: American Country Houses of to-Day : an Illustrated Account of Some Excellent Houses Built and Gardens Planted During the Last Few Years Showing Unmistakable Influence of the Modern Trend in Ideals Architectural, (1915), pp. 112-117. “Home of Mr. Edward C. Hoyt, near Stamford, Conn.: Newman & Harris, architects.”
  7. — “House of H. R. Towne, Esq., Stamford, Conn. – H. H. Holly, Arch’t.” and “Main hall in the house of H. R. Towne, Esq., Stamford, Conn. – H. H. Holly, Arch’t.” American Architect and Building News. 1879 Nov 8; Vol. 6, Plate No. 202.
Notes: Published by James R. Osgood & Co., Boston, Massachusetts, 1878-1908. Continued by American Architect, New York, New York, 1909. Imprint on Plate No. 202 reads: The Heliotype Printing Co., 230 Devonshire St., Boston.
Location: CtY, DLC, MB, MWA. 
Abstract: “House for Henry R. Towne, Esq., Stamford, Conn. Mr. H. Hudson Holly, Architect, New York, N. Y. – Interior view of the main hall of the same.” American Architect and Building News, p. 149
  8. Jarvis, Lucy Cushing. Sketches of church life in colonial Connecticut ; being the story of the transplanting of the Church of England into forty two parishes of Connecticut, with the assistance of the Society for the propagation of the gospel ; written by members of the parishes in celebration of the 200th anniversary of the society; edited by Lucy Cushing Jarvis. New Haven, Connecticut: Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company; 1902; 188 pp., front., plates, ports., facsims., 21 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads : “Sketches of Church Life in / Colonial Connecticut /       / BEING THE STORY OF THE / TRANSPLANTING OF THE / CHURCH OF ENGLAND INTO / FORTY-TWO PARISHES OF / CONNECTICUT, WITH THE / ASSISTANCE OF THE / SOCIETY FOR THE PROPA- / GATION OF THE GOSPEL / WRITTEN BY MEMBERS OF / THE PARISHES IN CELEBRA- /TION OF THE 200TH ANNI- / VERSARY OF THE SOCIETY /     / EDITED BY / LUCY CUSHING JARVIS /     / [cut of the seal of the State of Connecticut] / NEW HAVEN, CONN. : / THE TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE & TAYLOR COMPANY / 1902″
Location: CLobS, CLU, CoU, CtDabN, CtDar, CtEhar, CtGro, CtGu, CTHT, CtM, CtMer, CtMW, CtNh, CtNhH, CtNHi, CtNlC, CtNowi, CtOl, CtS, CtSoP, CtStr, CtWB, CtWhar, CtWilt, CtY, CU-SB, DeU, DLC, FTS, ICN, ICU, IDeKN, Infw, InNd, MCE, MH, MiD, MiDW, MiGr, MnHi, MoSW, MU, MWA, NcD, NcU, NGcA, NHemH, NIC, NN, NNC, OAU, OKentU, PBm, TU, TxU, UPB, ViU, VtU, WaU, WMUW, WNa.             Collier (p. 239).       Parks (No. 1567).
Reprinted in Anglicanism in early Connecticut and New England : a selective bibliography / by Kenneth Walter Cameron. Hartford, Connecticut, Transcendental Books, 1977.       Typographic error. Rev. Ebenezer Dibble died in 1799 not 1709 as indicated on p. 85. 
For references to St. John’s Episcopal Church, Stamford, Connecticut, see: pp. 82-85, 173- 175, 177-178, 183, 185
Abstract: “In 1742, the Episcopalians made an appeal to the town for a grant of land on which to build a church. As the result of this appeal, the town agreed to give the professors of the Church of England ‘a piece of land to set a church upon.’ The lot was to be forty-five feet long and thirty-five feet wide. The lot granted as above was the southwest corner of the present lot held by St. John’s parish, about where the transept of the new church stands. ‘It was at that time a rude ledge of loose rock, bounded on the north and east by an almost impassable swamp,’ from which it would appear that the town did not much favor the Church of England. The Episcopalians, however, thanked the town for the omen, that they were founded upon a rock.”     Lucy Cushing Jarvis, p. 83.
  9. Jenks, Stephen. Laus Deo. The New-England harmonist: containing concise and easy rules of music: together with a number of tunes adapted to public worship, most of which were never before published. Danbury, (Connecticut): Printed by Douglas & Nichols, for the author (copy-right secured.); (1800); 8, 17-24 pp., [1], 26-64 pp. of plates music, 15 x 23 cm.   
Notes: Title page reads: “LAUS DEO / THE / NEW-ENGLAND HARMONIST / CONTAINING, / CONCISE AND EASY RULES OF MUSIC: / TOGETHER WITH A NUMBER OF TUNES ADAPTED TO PUBLIC WORSHIP, MOST OF WHICH WERE NEVER / BEFORE PUBLISHED. /   –   / By STEPHEN JENKS. /   –   / DANBURY : PRINTED BY DOUGLAS & NICHOLS, FOR THE AUTHOR. / (Copy-right secured.)” 
Location: CtY, MnU, MWA.             Evans (No. 37707).         “Engraved & printed for the author by Amos Doolittle. New Haven July 16, 1800”   
The hymn on Plate 43 is titled “NORTH-STAMFORD”   The hymn on Plate 49 is titled “Mount-Vernon … Composed on the death of Genl. WASHINGTON”
For additional information on Stephen Jenks, see: David Warren Steel, editor Collected works / Stephen Jenks. (1995) A-R Editions, Inc. ISBN: 0895793164 
Abstract: “Music is a pleasing science, and when properly improved is equally beneficial to Society and individuals; as it has a tendency to reconcile discordant hearts and to unite them in the social bands of friendship. It qualifies us to take an active part in that delightful exercise which is the brightest ornament of Religious Worship; raises in the breast feelings the most noble, and it our first resource in the trying hour of affliction. As saith the Poet,

’Music’s the cordial of a troubled breast,
The softest remedy that grief can find:
The gentle spell that charms our cares to rest,
and fills with heavenly hope the pensive mind.’   HARRIS.

By the Public’s Humble Servant.     THE EDITOR.

RIDGEFIELD, 24 September, 1799.” Stephen Jenks, preface page.
  10. Jennings, Curtis E. A brief history of Lionism in Connecticut. Olson, Kenneth V.: State Council Connecticut Lions Multiple District 23; (1986); xii, 321 pp., illus., table of contents, appendixes, map, bibliography, 24 cm. 
Notes: Title on cover reads: “A Brief History of Lionism / in Connecticut / 1922-1983 / [embossed with a shield containing the word Connecticut, beneath which is an outline of the State of Connecticut, together with Lions International’s insignia]” 
For references to the Springdale Lions Club, see: pp. 16, 79, 228. For references to the Stamford Lions Club, see: pp. 11, 13, 79, 228. For references to the North Stamford Lions Club, see: pp. 79, 228.
Location: Ct, CtBris, CtChh, CtEham, CtEhar, CtGre, CtMer, CtNb, CtNbC, CtNm, CtNowa, CtManc, CtS, CtSHi, CtStr, CtTmp, CtWB, CtWilt, CtWrf, DLC.
  11. Jennings, Isaac. A sermon for the times : preached to the First Church and Society in Stamford, Conn., April 24th, 1853. New York, (New York): S. W. Benedict; 1853; 15 pp., paper covers, 23 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads: “A / SERMON FOR THE TIMES; / PREACHED TO THE / First Church and Society in Stamford, Conn., / APRIL 24th, 1853. / BY ISAAC JENNINGS. / PUBLISHED BY REQUEST. / NEW YORK: / S. W. BENEDICT, PRINTER, 16 SPRUCE STREET. / 1853.”
Location: CtY, MiU.
Abstract: “‘What shall be done with the Slaves? and, what shall be done with the Young?’ ‘These,’ said an eminent servant of God, in my hearing recently, ‘are the two great problems of this day.’ Weighty sentences, and worth repeating abroad. But, in order to a due solution of the former problem, must we not, first, attain to a due solution of the latter? ‘Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not; for of such is the kingdom of God.’ To draw from this oft-quoted, yet ever-beautiful saying of our Lord, that heaven is chiefly filled with those who die in early childhood, is not the most masterly interpretation of it. Rather, with those who come to Jesus in early childhood. But little children do not come to Jesus except they are brought. Indeed there would be no need of their coming to Jesus at all, if they could begin aright of themselves.” Isaac Jennings, p. 3.
  12. Jennings, W. D. “Street lighting in Stamford, Connecticut: Installation recently completed said to be one of the best ornamental systems in the East.” American City. 1921 Nov; Vol. 25 (No. 5) pp. 400-402; ISSN: 0002-7936.
Notes: Published by Civic Press, New York, New York.                                               
Location: Ct, CtB, CtFaU, CtH, CtNb, CtNbC, CtU, DLC, MH.        Harvey (p. 42).       White (p. 3).
Abstract: “The new equipment consists of 150 General Electric direct-current, 6.6-ampere series ornamental luminous arc lamps, equipped with 8-panel alabaster globes of pleasing design. The lamps are placed on top of ornamental posts, with a mounting of 14 feet 6 inches to the light source. The standards are located approximately 100 feet apart, on each side of the street with staggered arrangement, and are operated from two circuits, so that lamps on alternate sides of the street can be extinguished after midnight, with the exception of lamps adjacent to the Town Hall, which burn all night. Each lamp has a series absolute plug cutout installed in the base of the ornamental pole, and when the plug is removed all connection between lamp and line is absolutely opened. For convenience in trimming, a 750-pound electric truck was converted into a tower-wagon. This has been found almost indispensable when changing arc lamps or cleaning the globes, and in addition is used for renewing burned-out series incandescent lamps.” W. D. Jennings, pp. 400-401.
  13. Johnson, James successively Bishop of Gloucester and of Worcester. A sermon [on Psalms 144 : 15] preached before the incorporated Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts; at their anniversary meeting in the parish church of St. Mary-le-Bow, on Friday February 24, 1758. London: Printed by E. Owen and T. Harrison. Sold by A. Millar.; 1758; 77 pp., paper covers, 25 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads: “A / SERMON / Preached before the / Incorporated SOCIETY / FOR THE / Propagation of the Gospel in / Foreign Parts; / AT THEIR / ANNIVERSARY MEETING / IN THE / Parish Church of ST. MARY-LE-BOW, / On FRIDAY February 24, 1758. / – / By the Right Reverend Father in GOD, / JAMES Lord Bishop of GLOCESTER. / – / LONDON: / Printed by E. OWEN and T. HARRISON in / Warwick-Lane; and Sold by A. MILLAR / at Buchanan’s Head in the Strand. / – / MDCCLVIII [1758].”
Location: CtHT, CtSoP, CtY, DLC, GU, MH, NIC, RPJCB.
Includes “An abstract of the Proceedings of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts” (pp. 21-57) has running title: “An abstract of the Proceedings of the Society.”
Abstract: “The Rev. Mr. Dibble, the Society’s Missionary at Stamford, acquaints the Society by his Letter dated April 12, 1757, that he continues in a constant painful discharge of the Duties of his Mission, and his Church is in a peaceful increasing State, … .”     An abstract of the Proceedings of the Society, p. 40.
  14. Johnson, Sandra. Stamford : black achievement honor roll, a look at our past. Prince, Gracie and Scott, Merna. Stamford, Connecticut: Urban League of Southwestern Fairfield County; (1981?), (32) pp., paper covers, 22 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads: “STAMFORD : / BLACK ACHIEVEMENT HONOR ROLL / A LOOK AT OUR PAST / URBAN LEAGUE OF / SOUTHWESTERN FAIRFIELD / COUNTY / 231 MAIN STREET / STAMFORD, CT. 06902”     Title from cover.   Includes logo of the National Urban League on both front and back covers.   
Location: CtS, CtSHi.
Contains information on nineteenth and twentieth century Stamford blacks who made significant contributions to the community.
  15. Johnston, Howard Agnew. The word made flesh : A Christmas message. n.p. n.d. 16 pp., paper covers, 18 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads: “‘The Word Made Flesh’ /       / [cut of a cross] /     / A Christmas Message by / Howard Agnew Johnston, / Pastor Presbyterian Church, Stamford, Conn.”
Location: CtSHi. 
Abstract: “It was just so with the word electricity. Through the years its message waited for men but they thought the lightning out of the sky was a bolt of vengeance from the hand of some god. One day Franklin caught a glimpse of the truth, while Edison, Tessla and Marconi have spelled much further into this great word. As a result we now have somewhat of its power in light and heat and propelling force. But mark well the fact that only so far as it has been made flesh, only in so far as it has been brought down into human life, human experience, human affairs, is it ours. Beyond that point it eludes and baffles us still.

And so it has been with that wonderful word “liberty” with its priceless blessings for humanity. Only in so far as it has been wrought into flesh and blood, into heart throbs and hand grasps in the life of some Luther, some Knox, some Washington, some Garibaldi, some Lincoln, has it been able to reveal its blessings before mankind. Wherever to-day liberty has begun its work in any spot of the globe, it is because there it has been made flesh.

Thus you will see the universal character of this principle, its absolutely imperative necessity of men shall ever have the blessings of the truth in daily life. Therefore we read concerning Jesus Christ, in the Epistle to the Hebrews, ‘Lo, a body hast thou prepared me! I come to do thy will, O God.’ It was absolutely necessary that the truth about the living God and his plan for men and his laws that obtain in human conduct should be known and preached by mankind in the only way, namely, by being made flesh.”   Howard Agnew Johnston, pp. 7-8.
  16. Jones, E. Alfred (Edward Alfred). The old silver of American churches. Letchworth, England: Privately printed for the National Society of Colonial Dames of America, at the Arden Press; 1913; p. l., ix-lxxxvii, 566 pp., 1 l. illus., CXLV pl., 40 x 29 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads: “THE OLD SILVER OF / AMERICAN CHURCHES / BY E. ALFRED JONES / AUTHOR OF THE GOLD & SILVER OF WINDSOR CASTLE / THE OLD ENGLISH PLATE OF THE EMPEROR OF RUSSIA / THE OLD PLATE OF THE CAMBRIDGE COLLEGES / AND OTHER WORKS /       / PRIVATELY PRINTED FOR THE / NATIONAL SOCIETY OF COLONIAL DAMES OF AMERICA / AT THE ARDEN PRESS LETCHWORTH ENGLAND / M·DCCCC·XIII [1913]”       “FIVE HUNDRED AND SIX COPIES OF / THIS BOOK HAVE BEEN PRINTED. / THIS IS N° —.”     
For references to silver held by The First Congregational Church and St. John’s Episcopal Church, both of Stamford, Connecticut, see: pp. 457-460, plate cxxxlll, op. p. 454.
Location: CtB, CtNbC, CtY, DLC, MB, MH, MiU, MWA, NN.       The arms engraved on the vessels are reproduced, and brief genealogical notices of the donors are given, also the “maker’s mark” when it can be obtained.       For information regarding the significance of these objects in early Connecticut towns, see: “In a Feasting Posture”: Communion Vessels and Community Values in Seventeenth – and Eighteenth – Century New England, by Barbara McLean Ward. Winterthur Portfolio, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring, 1988), pp. 1-24. Published by The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, Inc.
  17. Jones, Robert M. (Robert Miller). “Glad Hand Press.” Private Library. 1989 Summer; Vol. 2 (Fourth Series), (No. 2) pp. 52-81; ISSN: 0032-8898.
Notes: Published by the Private Libraries Association, Ravelston, South View Road, Pinner, Middlesex, England.
Location: AU, AzTeS, AZU, CLU, CLSU, CoD, CSdS, CSjU, CtHT, CtSHi, CU, CU-S, DGU, DLC, DNGA, DSI, FTaSU, FU, GASU, GEU, GU, HU, ICALA, ICarbS, ICN, IDeKN, ILfC, IMacoW, InLP, INS, InTI, InU, IRivfR, IU, KMK, KyU, LNT, LU, MA, MBAt, MBSi, MBU, Mi, MiD, MiDW, MiEM, MiU, MoS, MoSU, MoU, MsHaU, MWalB, NAIU, NbOU, NBU, NBuU, NcD, NcGU, NcU, NGvP, Nj, NjP, NNStJ-L, NSbSU, NSyU, OkU, OrU, P, PBm, PEdiS, PMilS, PP, PPiC, PPiU, PPT, PSC, RU, TxComS, TxDam, TxDN, TxDW, TxSaC, TxU, UPB, Vi, ViV, ViW, WaU, WMUW, WU.                                                                                                                   Cover illustration of this issue is the press mark of the Glad Hand Press, engraved by John DePol, 1981.       Also included is a “Checklist of Books Printed at The Glad Hand Press,” compiled by David Chambers, with notes by Robert M. Jones, pp. 68-81.
In this article, Robert M. Jones describes the founding of his private press, at his home on Rachelle Avenue, Stamford, Connecticut.

© 2012 Stamford Historical Society, Inc.


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