Stamford, Connecticut – A Bibliography – V

Bibliography Items:
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Index: 0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | HI | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | XYZ
Refers to the index of names and subjects covered by individual bibliography items.

Abbreviations
Locations

  1. Vail, R. P. H. (Richard Philip Hart). A tribute to the memory of Alexander Milne. New York, [New York]: Wm. C. Martin Printing House; 1891; 30, [1], pp., [2] leaves of plates, illus., port., 21 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads: “A TRIBUTE / TO THE MEMORY OF / ALEXANDER MILNE / BY THE / REV. R. P. H. VAIL, D.D. / DELIVERED IN THE / First Presbyterian Church, Stamford, Conn. / April 13th, 1891 /      / TOGETHER WITH THE RESOLUTIONS PASSED AT A MEETING OF THE SESSION OF / THE CHURCH, HELD MONDAY EVENING , APRIL 13, 1891, AND A MINUTE / OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE Y. M. C. A. OF THE / CITY OF NEW YORK. /       / New York / WILLIAM C. MARTIN PRINTING HOUSE, 111 JOHN STREET / 1891″
Includes text of a sermon delivered by Rev. Richard Philip Hart Vail in the First Presbyterian Church, Stamford, Connecticut, April 13th, 1891.
Location: Ct, CtS, CtSHi, CtY, NjPT, NN, ViU.       Wegelin (p. 30).
Abstract: “I need scarcely say how thoroughly Mr. Milne has been identified with the Presbyterian Church of Stamford from its inception until now. That story is too rich and full for rehearsal to-day. It was in his heart and mind that the foundations of Presbyterianism here were laid. He was the father of the church. The meeting in which the idea of it first took shape was held at his house in 1852.

With George Elder, his companion and friend, he became ruling elder when the church was organized with 25 members, in 1853. These two men, elders each of them until death, were the Jachin and Boaz of this temple. They were pillars in the house of the Lord.” Richard Philip Hart Vail, pp. 23-24.
  2. Van Kirk, Gladdys. “To serve the present age.” Columns. 1962 Apr; Vol. 29 (No. 7) pp. 15, 23.
Notes: Published by the Westchester Woman’s Club, Mount Vernon, New York.             
Location: DLC.
Article regarding the First Presbyterian Church of Stamford, Connecticut.
  3. Vassar, Rena. “The Aftermath of Revolution: Letters of Anglican Clergymen in Connecticut, 1781-1785.” Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 1972 Dec; Vol. 41 (No. 4) pp. 429-462; ISSN: 0018-2486.
Notes: Published by Church Historical Society, under the authority of the General Convention, Austin, Texas.
Location: CaMWUC, CaNBFU, CtHT, CtY, DLC, ICRL, InU, LU, MB, MH-AH, N, NBuU, NSyU, OrU, PHi, PU.
For additional information on Ebenezer Dibble and his letter of June 1, 1783, see: Kenneth W. Cameron The Church of England in pre-Revolutionary Connecticut: new documents and letters concerning the loyalist clergy and the plight of their surviving church. Hartford [1976], leaves 210-211.
  4. Vergara, Camilo J. Needs assessment survey of the Hispanic population of Stamford, 1977-1978. Stamford, Connecticut: Spanish International Center; 1978; [6], 82, 18, [4] leaves, illus., charts, graphs, map, forms, footnotes, 28 cm. 
Notes: Title page reads: “NEEDS ASSESSMENT SURVEY OF THE / HISPANIC POPULATION OF STAMFORD / 1977 – 1978 / BY / CAMILO J. VERGARA / Sponsored by : / THE SPANISH INTERNATIONAL CENTER, INC. / 137 Henry Street / Stamford, Connecticut / Funded by : / STAMFORD COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM / 429 Atlantic Street / Stamford, Connecticut / and / CETA – COMPREHENSIVE EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ACT / 20 Summer Street / Stamford, Connecticut” 
Location: Ct, CtS, CtSHi, CtY.
Abstract: “PURPOSE OF THE SURVEY

The Needs Assessment Survey of the Hispanic people of Stamford, a one year program funded through grants by CETA Title VI and Community Development, was created with the purpose of providing a comprehensive view of the City’s Hispanic population and to suggest solutions to the most pressing problems facing them.

The commission to conduct this survey was given to The Spanish International Center, a local agency, and Camilo Vergara was hired as project director. The questionnaire for the survey was developed through many discussions with an advisory council which had community membership. The quality of the questionnaire, the large number of interviews, and the thoroughness of the analysis is due in large part to the deep commitment of the members of the council.

The Survey focused on the following areas: 1) Demography – size, age, sex composition, origin, and migration patterns of the population; 2) Social Integration – to what extent Hispanics participate in the social, political and economic life of the City, and how participation is affected by the lack of knowledge of English; 3) Socio-economic Background of the Population – labor force participation, most frequent types of employment, level of earnings, type and years of completed education, frequency of use and evaluation of the services most utilized by the Hispanics in the City; and 4) Housing – evaluation of the dwellings of Hispanics, amount of rent paid, adequacy of the heating system and over-all condition of the housing unit.

Stamford is an exceptional city in that it has recently become an international business center. Nevertheless, it is believed that from the Stamford Survey certain insights can be gained into the situation of Hispanics in most medium-sized cities.

The conditions described in this report are not only characteristic of Stamford, but also of many medium-sized cities in the region where the local Hispanics do not participate in politics.” Camilo J. Vergara, pp. 1-2.
  5. Viele, Egbert L. (Egbert Ludovickus). Malaria in Western Connecticut. Hartford, Connecticut: State Board of Health of the State of Connecticut; 1882; 16 pp., paper covers, 23 cm. (State of Connecticut public document). 
Notes: Title page reads: “MALARIA / IN / WESTERN CONNECTICUT. / – / GEN. EGBERT L. VIELE, / OF NEW YORK.”
Location: Ct, DLC.
From: “FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT / OF THE / STATE BOARD OF HEALTH / OF THE / STATE OF CONNECTICUT / FOR THE / Fiscal Year Ending November 30, 1881. / – / Printed by Order of the Legislature / – / HARTFORD, CONN. / PRESS OF THE CASE, LOCKWOOD & BRAINARD COMPANY. / 1882.”
Pagination of this account in the annual report is: pp. (225-227), 228-241.
”General Viele also condemned the obstruction of the Mill River by a dam, known as the Mill Pond, operated by the Harding Woolen Company. Homeowners, with riparian rights, vehemently protested the draining of the river during times of drought by the company. The Burgesses confined their efforts to attempts to persuade Mr. Harding to alter his methods. A fire, which totally destroyed the woolen company plant, in 1886, removed the nuisance.” Estelle F. Feinstein, Stamford in the Gilded Age: The Political Life of a Connecticut Town 1868-1893, pp. 159, 287. 
For additional information on Egbert Ludovickus Viele, see: Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. 10, pp. 267-268.
Abstract: “Like most of the towns along the Sound, its natural drainage is excellent, and also like many of these towns, this natural drainage has been interrupted in its flow. A stream called Mill River runs through the heart of the town, which has been obstructed in two places by dams, and a woolen-mill uses the water stored in a large pond formed by the upper dam. The pond has created a considerable area of saturation, and receives a good deal of surface drainage. The result is an accumulation at the bottom of the pond of a large amount of refuse and offensive organic mater. When in a season of drought, or for any other cause, the water in this pond is diminished, this decomposing mater is exposed to the action of the sun, giving out fetid and disagreeable odors. It is stated by physicians that during the past season the water in this stream was so low that there was very little water in the pond, almost the entire area of several acres in extent being uncovered, exposing a black mass of decomposition, offensive to every sense and that with very few exceptions the residents in the immediate vicinity were attacked with malaria in some form or another.

A second dam, below the one referred to, seems to have no other use than to obstruct the free flow of the water both tidal and river, and produce an accumulation of decomposing matter.” Robert L. Viele, pp. 279-280.
  6. Von Eckardt, Wolf. “Final question: A lay report on Harrison’s Stamford church.” Journal of The American Institute of Architects. 1959 Jun; Vol. 31 (No. 6) pp. 36-40; ISSN: 0001-1479.
Notes: Published by The American Institute of Architects, Washington, D. C.         
Location: DLC, MB.
Interview with Wallace Harrison, architect of the First Presbyterian Church, Stamford, Connecticut.

© 2012 Stamford Historical Society, Inc.


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